Research Fellows at CEDLA

Dr Javier Corrales Dr Javier Corrales, 4 May – 8 July 2018

Research Fellow & Assistant Professor
Professor of Political Science
Amherst College in Amherst, Massachusetts
jcorrales@amherst.edu

Dr Javier Corrales Maíra Borges Fainguelernt, March – August 2018

TERRITORIALITIES AND LIVELIHOODS ON THE FRINGE OF DEVELOPMENT: AN INVESTIGATION ON RIVERINE PEOPLES OF “TERRA DO MEIO” AND THE IMPACTS OF BELO MONTE DAM IN THE STATE OF PARA, BRAZILIAN AMAZON


The Brazilian Amazon has a rich cultural and ecological diversity evident in three extractive reserves (Resex) in the Para state which are located in a priority area for conservation, known as "Terra do Meio". These Resex were not considered as 'affected' by the Brazilian Institute for the Environment and Natural Resources (IBAMA) during the environmental licensing process, but recent research suggests otherwise. I aim to highlight the impacts the Belo Monte dam has had on the riverine people who reside in these reserves. In doing so, my research will show how these extractive reserves have sought to deal with these social and environmental impacts brought by the dam. The case study's intention is to find local solutions to reduce the cultural, social, economic and ecological impacts mega-dams have in the Amazon region. Since such dams are controversial in nature, findings from the study will aid in overcoming gaps in knowledge about these social groups which have been largely overlooked. The analysis presents the collective identity assumed by people in different territories, deserving context specific policies which can maintain each group's autonomy and sustain their territorialities and livelihoods.

Emilie Dupuits, March – August 2018

Natural resources community-based governance – mainly focusing on drinking water services and community forestry management – and transnational grassroots movements in the Latin American continent



Emilie’s research interests deal with natural resources community-based governance – mainly focusing on drinking water services and community forestry management – and transnational grassroots movements in the Latin American continent. In her PhD thesis, Emilie analyzed the transformations of water and forest community governance induced by transnational environmental dynamics, with case studies in Ecuador and Guatemala. During her stay at CEDLA, Emilie aims to continue developing a collaborative research agenda on transnational grassroots movements and environmental governance in the Latin-American region, focusing on issues of resistance, exclusion and peripheral spaces of mobilization. She also aims to contribute to the bridging of different academic institutions from the Netherlands, Switzerland and Ecuador for future collective research avenues.