Courses offered in English 2011-2012

For students attending universities in the Netherlands who are interested in registering for the following courses at the Bachelor (BA) and Master (MA) level and given in English, please contact the secretariat of CEDLA for further details.

Please note that this year we offer 7 courses given in English. Click on the tabs for more information:


  • MA 1
  • MA 2
  • MA 3
  • MA 4
  • MA 5
  • MA 6
  • BA 3

ma1MA1 The Identity of the City

Course lecturers:
Dr. Christien KlaufusDr. Arij Ouweneel
Period: 2 November 2011 – 25 januari 2012
Time: Wednesdays 15.00 – 17.00 hours
(Study groups)
Course load: 10 EC's
Maximum number of participants: 15
Registration form



Latin America is the New World, the continent of hope. Hope for a better life for the poor; hope for a more egalitarian society. People used to think that this hope was to be found on the countryside, in the life of the peasants and Indians. Not surprisingly, our attention is nowadays directed towards the city as a hotbed of resistance; as a location of alternative identity constructions, as Latin America has urbanized at a high pace over the last decade: more than three quarters of the population live in urban areas. The time when the physical form of the Latin American city was thought to determine its social order is over. Today cities are addressed by exploring the identity of the resistance, as a new face of this New World. In this course, students will themselves explore the workings of this identity formation and its roots, making use of human-geographical and cultural studies. In the introductory part an overview will be given of Latin American urban studies and the history of urban development. The attention will subse-quently be shifted toward contemporary social movements, socio-spatial segregation, violence, urban policies and urban governance. De course rounds up with working groups that address everyday experi-ences in the city, as well as identifications with the city and urban imaginaries on TV, in music, and in the cinema.

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ma2 MA2 Gender, family and poverty in Latin America

Course lecturer: Dr. Annelou Ypeij
Period: 3 November 2011 – January 2012
Time: Thursdays 12.00 – 16.30 hours
Course load: 6 EC’s, can be extended to 10
Max. aantal deelnemers: 15

Registration form




In the last twenty years gender relations in Latin America have been greatly transformed within the context of globalization processes and reforms. Restructured labour markets, growing poverty and increasing migration flows have meant new challenges and problems in the daily lives of poor women and men, but they also offer new opportunities. These social transformations have often led to a repositioning of women and men in relation to each other in which process they renegotiate their relationships. Conceptions of femininity and masculinity are constantly being reconstructed and are acquiring new meanings.

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ma3MA3 Globalisation and the Future of Amazonia

Course lecturer: Dr. Pitou van Dijck
Period: 22 November 2011 – 31 January 2012
Time: Tuesdays 14.00 – 17.00 hours
Course load: 6 EC's (can be extended to 10 EC's)
Max. number of participants: 15
Entry requirements: Basic knowledge of economics

Registration form

 

In the last twenty years gender relations in Latin America have been greatly transformed within the context of globalization processes and reforms. Restructured labour markets, growing poverty and increasing migration flows have meant new challenges and problems in the daily lives of poor women and men, but they also offer new opportunities. These social transformations have often led to a repositioning of women and men in relation to each other in which process they renegotiate their relationships. Conceptions of femininity and masculinity are constantly being reconstructed and are acquiring new meanings.

This course investigates the dynamics of gender relations in Latin America in the context of poverty and is intended as an introduction to the field of gender studies. Attention will be given to the theoretical developments in this area chiefly from within the disciplines of cultural anthropology and development studies. In addition, case studies will be presented that will offer examples of daily experience. Themes dealt with will include: the debate on machismo, marianismo and masculinity; different family systems and constructions of motherhood and fatherhood; indigenous constructions of masculinity and femininity; sur-vival strategies; informal economy; social networks and social capital.

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ma4MA4 Globalisation, Regionalisation and Economic Development in Latin America

Course lecturer: Dr. Pitou van Dijck
Period: 24 Novmber 2011 – 2 February 2012
Time: Thursdays 14.00 – 17.00 hours
Course load: 6 EC's (can be extended to 10 EC's)
Max. no. of participants: 15
Entry requirement: Basic knowledge of economics

Registration Form

Globalisation is a container term, including economic, political, social and cultural dimensions. In the course of time, driving forces, leading actors and nations, policies, and effects for stakeholders in the process have changed strongly. Clearly, globalisation is a long-term and global phenomenon affecting all countries, and its implications differ in time and across countries. After a long period of more inward-orientated and state-dominated development throughout several decades, neoliberal policies have started to support the opening of many Latin American countries since the late 1980s. The process of integration in international markets for goods, services, labour and capital has been structured and stimulated in Land America by government policies and initiatives to open economies unilaterally in the context of the so-called Washington Agenda.

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ma5MA5 Natural Resources and Environmental Management
in Latin America

Course lecturer: Dr. Fábio de Castro
Period: 30 January – 2 April 2012
Time: Mondays 14.00 – 17.00 hours
Course load: 10 EC's
Max. no. of participants: 15

Registration Form


The pattern of natural resource use during the pre-Colombian period has strongly been influenced by local environmental factors in Latin America. The diversity of landscape (e.g., rainforest, mountains, plains, and coasts) reveals distinct management systems by the indigenous groups according to the spatial and temporal distribution and abundance of natural resources. The arrival of the Europeans introduced new production systems, institutions, and social relations in the region. The interplay between the local environmental factors and the external social variables introduced during the colonization and post-colonial periods has led to a myriad of rural societies (e.g., maroons, mestizos, rubber tappers, and ribereños) and patterns of resource use (e.g., water management, fishing, forestry, shifting cultivation) we see today. More recently, the international concern regarding the role of the tropical forests on global climate change has added to this process by stimulating preservationist policies (e.g., conservation units, indigenous reserves, co-management initiatives) which have direct influence on how rural populations appropriate and use natural resources.

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ma6MA6 Social movements and democracy:
Social capital and civic engagement in Latin America

Course lecturer: Prof. dr. Michiel Baud
Period: 31 january – 25 April 2012
Time: Tuesdays 14.00 – 17.00 hours
Course load: 10 EC's
Max. nnumber of participants: 15
Entry requirement: Passive knowledge of Spanish

Registration form


Latin America is a continent where the political - lo político - pervades every aspect of society. This has led social scientists to focus their attention over the last decades on social and political movements. As a consequence, there has been a tendency to underestimate the associational character of many social movements in which individual members build networks of solidarity and civic engagement. It also led to ignoring social organizations which do not directly aim at resource mobilization or political objectives. This course aims at understanding and analysing these two connected elements in Latin America. This will imply two exercises. First, we will try to understand the character of different types of movements and associations. Secondly, we will discuss to what extent we can look to social and political movements in different ways. To do so, we will critically look at the concept of social capital and discuss to what extent it can help us to answer the questions above.

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ba3BA3 Gender, family and poverty in LA

Dr. Annelou Ypeij
Period: 3 November2011 – January 2012 
Time: Thursdays 12.00 –15.00 hours
Course load: 6 EC’s, can be extended to 10
Max. aantal deelnemers: 20
Entry requirement: BA 1 (I)

Registration form




In the last twenty years gender relations in Latin America have been greatly transformed within the context of globalization processes and reforms. Restructured labour markets, growing poverty and increasing migration flows have meant new challenges and problems in the daily lives of poor women and men, but they also offer new opportunities. These social transformations have often led to a repo-sitioning of women and men in relation to each other in which process they renegotiate their relation-ships. Conceptions of femininity and masculinity are constantly being reconstructed and are acquiring new meanings.

Read more